Recent Posts

Choosing a Graduate School

in Undergraduate Students

Choosing a School Introduction Most prospective graduate students know the importance of choosing a “good” graduate school, but few fully appreciate the variety of considerations which can go into making a school a good one. Academic ratings such as those found in U.S. News and World Report provide information that is easy to obtain and understand. However, as in most […]

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Interview with Dr. Colin Dueck

in Graduate Students, Media

Jeanne Hoffman interviews Colin Dueck about his experience with IHS’s Humane Studies Fellowships, his current work and advice for aspiring academics. Dr. Dueck is an assistant professor at George Mason University’s department of Public and International Affairs and member of the International Institute for Strategic Studies Get KosmosOnline podcasts on iTunes Click here for more information about IHS’s Humane Studies Fellowship mentioned by […]

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Succeeding In The World Of Ideas: A Career Development Guide for Students

in Graduate Students

This is an excerpt from a career guide published by IHS, Succeeding in The World of Ideas. INTRODUCTION: WHY YOU SHOULD CONSIDER A CAREER IN IDEAS Ideas have consequences, to quote the title of Richard M. Weaver’s radical critique of modern civilization published in 1948. F. A. “Baldy” Harper realized this — which is why he founded the Institute for Humane […]

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Ayn Rand and the Trader Principle

in Graduate Students

Editor’s Note: This post if from IHS Program Officer Dr. Bill Glod. Ayn Rand and the Trader Principle (based on a talk I gave at the IHS “Morality, Capitalism, and Freedom” seminar held at Wake Forest University, July 2010.) “The symbol of all relationships among [rational] men, the moral symbol of respect for human beings, is the trader. We, who live by […]

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Interview with Professor Tom Bell

in Graduate Students, Media

In this IHS Academic podcast Jeanne Hoffman talks with Tom Bell, professor of law at Chapman University School of Law, about his career path, involvement with IHS and the current state of intellectual property. Professor Bell specializes in high-tech legal issues and has written a variety of papers on Intellectual Property and Internet Law. He has also taught at several IHS summer […]

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How the Income Tax led to Prohibition

in Scholarship

Though long thought of as the quintessential example of “legislating morality,” the story of Prohibition in the United States may be better understood as a matter of political economy. At least that’s the interpretation offered by several scholars of the Public Choice persuasion. Here’s the argument: Through much of the 19th and early 20th century a surprisingly large percentage of […]

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On Being an Effective Teacher: an Interview with Dr. Steve Horwitz

in Media, Teaching

Chris Martin interviews Dr. Steven Horwitz, Professor of Economics at St. Lawrence University in New York, about becoming a great teacher. Steve talks about his own evolution as an economics professor and shares tips highly useful for new and experienced teachers alike. For your reference, the two books Steve mentions in the conversation are: Finkel, Donald L. 2000. Teaching with […]

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Aplia: Another Secret Weapon for Instructors

in Teaching

In the Wealth of Nations, Adam Smith famously wrote that “[i]t is the maxim of every prudent master of a family, never to attempt to make at home what it will cost him more to make than to buy.” As well as informing discussions about trade, Smith’s advice can also be helpful to instructors. No one feels, for example, that they have […]

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Will the Digitization of Documents Change the Way We Research?

in Faculty

A few days ago I read this article about the Dead Sea Scrolls becoming available online, and it made me wonder if the increasing number of digitized resources will change the way academics conduct research. If you had wanted to look at these scrolls last year, you would have to travel to Israel, make special arrangements with the IAA to […]

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David Bernstein on his forthcoming book, “Rehabilitating Lochner”

in Media, Scholarship

Jeanne Hoffman talks with David Bernstein about his forthcoming book, Rehabilitating Lochner. Professor Bernstein is Foundation Professor at the George Mason School of Law where he has been teaching since 1995. He is an expert on the “Lochner era” of American constitutional jurisprudence. In addition to Rehabilitating Lochner, he is the author of Only One Place of Redress: African-Americans, Labor […]

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